Caribbean Studies Syllabus

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MODUStudents should be able to: 1. Locate and define the Caribbean; 2. Explain the terms ‘society’ and ‘culture’; 3. Describe the characteristic features of Caribbean society and culture 4. Analyze the impact of the historical processes in Caribbean society and culture; . Assess the impact of geographical processes on Caribbean society and culture 6. Evaluate the ways in which societal institutions impact on their lives; 7. Analyze how the global community and Caribbean society impact on each other CONTENT 1. Location and Definition of the Caribbean Region i. Geographical location: a. Names of territories b. Sub-regions, for example, Greater Antilles, Lesser Antilles, Western Caribbean, Southern Caribbean, The Bahamas; c. Position of territories in relation to the Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean and the continental land masses i. Definitions of the Caribbean Region a. Geographical; b. Geological; c. Historical; d. Political; iii. Caribbean Identity and Culture 2. Characteristics of Society i. Society a. Shared common purpose; b. A defined territorial space; c. Continuity over time and space; d. Citizenship within a space; ii. Culture a. Learned behavior common to all human beings; b. Norms and values which provide a guide to behavior; c. Institutions which prescribe behavior; 3. Characteristics of Caribbean Society and Culture i. Cultural Diversity

Positive and negative effects of cultural diversity; ethnic and cultural differences; the accommodation made among different ethnic groups with respect to space, political and economic power and social visibility. ii. Social Stratification a. Plantation society and its impact on Caribbean social stratification (that is, race, colour, and money as major factors in social stratification); education as a basis for new class formation and upward mobility; b. Concepts such as plantocracy, intelligentsia, middle class, bourgeoisie, working class, underclass, caste; iii. Social Mobility iv. Hybridization a.

Factors such as racial admixture and colour in the formation of Caribbean society and culture; terms like mulatto, meztizo, dougla, transculturation, creole; b. Erasure, retention and renewal of cultural practices 4. Impact of Historical Processes i. Migratory movements and the establishment of patterns of settlement by different groups within the Caribbean from pre-Columbian times to the present ii. The development of systems of production: encomienda, slavery, indentureship, the plantation system iii. Responses of the Caribbean people to oppression and genocide: resistance, revolution, development of peasant groups v. Movements toward independence a. Political enfranchisement: i. Adult suffrage; ii. Internal self-government; iii. Economic enfranchisement; iv. Entrepreneurial activities, including shop-keeping and savings societies. 5. Impact of Geographical Phenomena i. Plate tectonics a. Definition; b. Location and movement of the Caribbean plate; c. Earthquakes and volcanoes: social displacement. ii. Hurricanes – social and economic consequences iii. Soils – erosion, conservation iv. Coral reefs – coastal protection, sustainability of fishing industry v. Droughts 6. Impact of Societal Institutions on Caribbean People i. Family i. Education iii. Religion iv. Justice System 7. Caribbean-Global Interactions i. Influences of extra-regional societies on the Caribbean a. Consumption patterns: goods and services; b. Creative expressions: festivals, music, theater arts, culinary practices; c. Education: impact of colonialism; the information age; language; curriculum reforms, for example, teaching of Caribbean Studies in universities in the United Kingdom d. Political influences: i. Westminister System; ii. Rule of law; iii. Electoral processes; iv. Caribbean contribution to the political life of the host communities of Europe and North America; . Labour: the influence of migratory labour; vi. Sport – cricket, soccer, basketball, track and field; vii. Religion – traditional and non-traditional religious practices e. Mass Media f. Tourism ii. Caribbean influences on extra-regional countries a. Important political issues created within countries of Europe and North America by the presence of large numbers of Caribbean people (for example, impact of the Haitians and Cubans living in Florida upon the politics of that State). b. The impact of Caribbean festivals like Notting Hill Carnival in the United Kingdom (U. K. Labour Day in Brooklyn, Carnival in Miami and Caribana in Canada on the economics of the areas where they occur ; the impact of migrant labour on the economies of the countries of North America. c. The impact of festivals and music of the Caribbean ( for example, carnival, calypso, reggae, punta, salsa, zouk) upon the festivals, music, pageants and street parades of the countries of North America, Europe, Africa, and of Japan. d. The impact of Rastafarianism on countries throughout the world e. The influence of Caribbean culinary practices within the countries of North America and Europe.

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Suggested teaching and Learning Activities To facilitate student’s attainment of the objectives in his Module, teachers are advised to engage students in the following teaching and learning activities. 1. Students are encouraged to compile a Glossary of key terms and concepts drawn from the module 2. Students can create a scrapbook based on newspaper, magazine and Internet clippings which are relevant to the themes in the Modules 3. Produce maps and charts to define the Caribbean illustrating features of the physical environment, patterns of settlement and migration 4.

Individual or group projects in which students conduct interviews with members of the society on societal and cultural changes 5. Lectures by elders of the community on the characteristics of Caribbean society and culture 6. Tours of plantations; documentaries on slavery, resistance and free villages and independence 7. Class debate on the struggles for, and benefits of independence 8. The use of video footage, photographs from media houses and international agencies on hurricanes and volcanoes. Students can produce their assessment of the impact of these disasters on society and economy 9.

Students can design posters on the importance of soils and coral reefs to territories 10. Invite musicians, calypsonians, and folklorists to give lectures on creative expressions 11. Students to deliver 5-7 minute presentations on the impact of societal institutions on Caribbean people RESOURCES Chavannes, B Rastafari: Roots and Ideology, Mona: Syracuse University Press Series, The Press, 1994 Deosaran, R. Reddock, R And Mustapha, N (eds) Contemporary Issues in Social Science: A Caribbean Perspective. Vol: 1, 1994 James, C. L. R. Beyond a Boundary, London: Hutchinson and Company Limited, 1993

Nettleford, R. Caribbean Cultural Identity, Kingston: Institutes of Jamaica, 1978 Payne, A. and Sutton, P. (eds. ) Modern Caribbean Politics, Kingston: Ian Randle Publications, 1993 Reddock, R. (ed. ) Ethnic Minorities in Caribbean Societies, St. Augustine: ISER, 1996 Sutton, C. and Chaney, S. (eds. ) Caribbean Life in New York City: Socio-cultural Dimensions, Centre of Migration Studies, 1987 Thomas, Hope E. Explanation in Caribbean Migration, London: The MacMillan Press Limited, 1992 http://www. pwi. netcom. com/hhenke http://www. caricom. org MODULE 2: ISSUES IN CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT

OVERVIEW Module 2 introduces students to different conditions which satisfy the definition of development; to interrelationships among social, cultural, political and economic factors in the development of the Caribbean region; and to key individuals and institutions which have shaped the region’s development GENERAL OBJECTIVE On completion of this Module, students should demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between: i. Politics, economics and development; ii. Culture and development; iii. Technology and development; iv. Social justice and development SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES Students should be able to: . Describe the concepts of development and the indicators used to measure development; 2. Evaluate how development in the region is influenced by political, economic, social, cultural, environmental and technological factors; 3. Assess the ways in which globalization affects development in the region; 4. Explain the ways in which the evolution of the integration movement in the Caribbean has influenced development in the region; 5. Evaluate the importance of sports to the development of the region; 6. Assess the significance of Caribbean thought to development of the region; 7.

Critically analyze factors which impact on the mass media’s contribution to the development of the region; 8. Formulate reasoned responses to issues of social justice within their communities CONTENT 1. Concepts and indicators of development i. Concepts a. Sustainable development b. Economic development ii. Indicators a. Levels of income b. Productivity c. Social and economic equalization d. Modern knowledge e. Improved institutions and attitudes f. A rationally co-ordinated system of policy measures g. Environmental factors 2. Factors that promote or hinder development i. Political ideologies; popular movements i. Distribution of wealth; resources; income generation iii. Changing class boundaries iv. Definition of Caribbean experience and identity v. Natural and man-made disasters vi. Impact of productive sector vii. Tourism a. Contribution b. Challenges 3. Globalization and Development i. Definition and Stages Facilitators of globalization, for example: a. World Trade Organization; b. International Monetary Fund; c. World Bank; d. Transnational organizations; e. Technology; f. Trade; g. Ideologies ii. Impact and Response a. Industry and commerce; b. Distributional sector (supermarkets, department stores); . Labour; d. Technology; e. Ideology 4. The integration movement i. The evolution of: federation, CARIFTA, CARICOM, OECS, ACS ii. Achievements and challenges of three of the following: a. Caribbean Community (CARICOM); b. University of the West Indies (UWI); c. Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC); d. West Indies Cricket Board (WICB); e. Caribbean Tourism Organization (CTO); f. Caribbean Single Market and Economy (CSME); g. Regional Security System (RSS) 5. Contributions of sport i. Generation of Income ii. Health and fitness iii. Educational opportunities iv. Sense of Caribbean identity v.

Discipline and morale vi. Presence on the world scene vii. Sports tourism 6. Intellectual traditions Objectives and impact of the following: a. Pan Africanism; b. Negritude; c. Industrialization by invitation; d. Marxism and neo-Marxism; e. Caribbean perspectives on British Capitalism; f. Trends in Caribbean feminist thought; g. Indo-Caribbean thought; h. Indigenous perspectives 7. Roles and functions of the mass media i. Provision of information about institutions, events and trends in individual countries, the region and the global community j. Entertainment k. Construction of national identity . Cultural imperialism 8. Social justice i. Knowledge of competing concepts of social justice, for example, recognition of natural rights, welfare and mutual advantage ii. Discrimination on the grounds of age, gender, ethnicity, race o class iii. Indicators of development affected by breaches of social justice: a. Levels of social and economic equalization b. Productivity c. Quality of life Suggested Teaching and Learning Activities To facilitate student’s attainment of the objectives in this module, teachers are advised to engage students in the following teaching and learning ctivities 1. Students are encouraged to compile a glossary of terms and concepts within the Module 2. Students should compile a scrap book on the lives and world of persons who have contributed to the development of the region in the field of politics, labour, the arts, sports. 3. A class research project: for example, the development by groups of students of charts to show a comparative performance among countries of the Caribbean region in areas like GNP, provision of health, literacy rates and unemployment 4. Student Parliamentary debate on the 1990 World bank Report for the Caribbean . Class debates on a range of topical issues, for example, the failure of the Federation, CARICOM, social justice, health, crime and economic issues 6. Panel discussion on Caribbean intellectual tradition 7. Students write a ‘play’ on globalization and its effects 8. A guided tour to a local media corporation 9. Students can evaluate television and radio programmes, advertisements based on criteria arrived at through class discussion 10. Students write letters to the editor of national newspapers, formulating responses to a range of issues 11. Students reate posters on the improper disposal of industrial waste, and overcrowding in urban centres. RESOURCES Beckles, H. A Spirit of Dominance: Cricket and Nationalism in the West Indies, Kingston: Ian Randle Publications, 1997 Globalization, Communications and Caribbean Identity, Kingston: Ian Randle Publications, 1995 Rethinking Development, Kingston: Consortium Graduate School In the Social Sciences, 1995 Black Meteors: The Caribbean in Intenational Athletics, Kingston: Ian Randle Publications, 1998 Dunn, H. S. (ed. ) Girvan, N. (ed) Ince, B. Leo-Rhynie, E. Bailey, B. and Barrow, C. eds. ) Gender: A Multi Disciplinary reader on the Caribbean, Kingston: Ian Randle Publications, 1996 MODULE 3: INVESTIGATING HUMAN AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE CARIBEAN OVERVIEW This Module introduces students to some of the major concepts and skills which should be mastered in conducting research. Through the research process, students will have the opportunity to deepen their understanding of a defined area of Caribbean experience which they have selected GENERAL OBJECTIVES On completion of this module, students should: 1. Demonstrate research and analytical skills; . Work independently or in teams to formulate, conduct and report on inquiries into issues they have identified as significant to the region 3. Appreciate the importance of ethical issues in conducting research SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES Students should be able to: 1. Explain the nature and purpose of research; 2. Identify a research problem; 3. Evaluate existing information about the problem; 4. Formulate relevant research questions and or hypothesis; 5. List various methods and instruments of data collection; 6. Apply appropriate formats in presenting data; 7.

Draw conclusions and make recommendations; 8. Use American Psychological Association convention correctly; 9. Adhere to basic principles for maintaining ethical standards in conducting research CONTENT 1. Nature and purpose of research i. Systematic enquiry ii. Generation of new knowledge iii. Reliability and validity in research iv. Problem solving 2. The research problem Identification of a research problem 3. Sources of Information h. Identifying and accessing sources: a. Existing literature; b. Internet Resources; c. Oral histories; d. Newspaper reports; e. Minutes of meetings; . Archive i. Criteria for selection and use: a. Relevance; b. Degree of objectivity; c. Adequacy 4. Characteristics of research objectives i. Relevance ii. Direct link to research problem iii. Informed by sources iv. Clarity 5. Methods and Instruments of Data Collection i. Sampling a. Probability and non-probability; b. Target population i. Surveys a. Types of surveys; b. Interview techniques; c. Questionnaire construction 6. Format of Presenting Data i. Tabular ii. Graphic iii. Text 7. Conclusion and Recommendation i. Main findings in relation to research objectives ii.

Areas of contention in relation to research objectives iii. New and interesting findings, if any iv. Limitations of the study v. Areas for further research 8. American Psychological Association Conventions (APAC) i. Bibliographies ii. Referencing 9. Principles of ethical conduct, for example: i. Consent of research subjects; ii. Respect for privacy and confidentiality; iii. Integrity and transparency of the research process THEMES Recommended Areas for Investigation The following themes represent areas of interest to the contemporary Caribbean in terms of their significance to regional development.

The list is not considered exhaustive and it is expected that new themes will be added. Under each theme heading, broad areas for possible study are identified for the guidance of students. Students may choose one of the themes to be the subject of the research project A. The Environment i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. Pollution Sewage and Solid Waste Management Coming to terms with Natural and man-made Disasters Housing growing populations Protection of Parks and the National heritage Toxic Waste Disposal Renewable and non-renewable resources of the Caribbean B. The Mass media i. ii. iii. iv. v.

Impact of selected media on cultural expressions and values Issues arising from the control of information by extraregional media organizations Issues surrounding censorship and freedom of information Effects of media messages on the economies of Caribbean countries The effects of new technologies on the growing influence of the mass media in the Caribbean C. Gender Issues in the Caribbean i. ii. iii. iv. v. Changing male-female relationships in the Caribbean – causes and characteristic features Gender issues in education Gender relations in the workplace Gender issues in the mass media Gender issues and the law

D. The Productive Sector and Development i. ii. iii. Farming practices and land tenure Development of appropriate technologies Impact of new technologies iv. Foreign dominance of the productive sector Tourism Agro-industries v. vi. E. Health i. ii. iii. iv. v. Changing patterns of disease The impact of cultural habits and value systems Traditional/modern medicine Health care and the economy Sexual and reproductive health – social, economic, ethical and legal issues F. Crime in the Caribbean i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi.

Crime as a function of changing social structures and technologies Trade in illicit narcotics Impact of crime on the economy and on the political structure Effects of crime on the society Impact on the physical well-being of individuals of the region International relations in the control of crime G. Sports i. ii. iii. iv. v. Effects of identified policies on the development of sports Physical benefits Sports and the regional/national economy Impact of developing technologies on performance in sports Changing patterns of interest and development H. The Work Place i. ii. iii. v. v. vi. Patterns of unemployment; causes and effects of unemployment Impact of changing technologies Challenges of entrepreneurial activity in the Caribbean Changing role of labour unions Industrial Law in the work place Providing education for the world of work I. The Languages of the Caribbean i. Historical and social factors shaping Caribbean Creoles ii. iii. iv. Implications for maintaining European languages as the official languages of the region Roles and functions of Creole languages within Caribbean societies Oral traditions within the culture J. Religion i. ii.

Emergence and persistence of folk forms of worship Religion and education in the region Impact of modernization on religion in the Caribbean Religion and alternative forms of medicine Religion and social change in the region Impact of religion on family values iii. iv. v. vi. K. Literary, Performing and Visual Arts i. Factors affecting the evolution of identified art forms (for example, history, inter-culturation, new technologies) Existing and potential roles for the performing arts in the development of countries within the Caribbean Ethical and legal issues – copyright, censorship Impact of globalization ii. iii. v. Suggested Teaching and Learning Activities To facilitate students’ attainment of the objectives in this Module, teachers are advised to engage students in the following teaching and learning activities. 1. Discuss the importance of the research paper in terms of the overall examination 2. Discuss research types and methods by teacher and other resource person(s) 3. Provide a range of examples of problems statements, followed by class discussion to critically evaluate the effectiveness and completeness of sample problem statements 4. Provide examples of literature reviews to identify pertinent elements, such as: i.

Relevance of theories and research findings to topic; ii. Agreement or disagreement between the stated theories; iii. Correct citation of sources 5. Group analysis of sample research reports so as to help students to arrive at an understanding of component parts, and of formats appropriate to different types of research design 6. Develop a glossary of research terms 7. Guided group library tours to help students to identify and access sources of information 8. Develop interviewing skills followed by class evaluation of the interviews 9. Mini-observation assignments within the classroom, the school, community or the workplace 0. Discuss the use and acknowledgment of sources to avoid plagiarism 11. Discuss the common problems encountered in designing and conducting research 12. Teacher feedback on project 13. Establish time lines for submission of drafts of the project Scope and Depth of Study Students should be guided in making decisions about scope and depth as they conduct and report on this study. Constraints of time and project length will affect the nature of the problem chosen, the population selected for study, and the extent of coverage of the relevant literature.

It will also increase the demand that coverage of the literature be relevant and succinct. Time Management During the course of study, twenty contact hours are proposed for teaching the basic concepts of research and the skills of preparing a research proposal and report, as well as for discussion of factors which must be considered at different stages of the study. Twenty hours are allocated for the student’s independent work in carrying out the different phases of the study. At this time, the role of the teacher will be that of an advisor RESOURCES Suggested Reading List

Boxill, I. , Chambers, C. M. , Wint, E. Introduction to Social research with Applications to the Caribbean, Kingston: Canoe Press, University of the West Indies, 1997 Roberts, P. West Indians and their Language, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001 Sanders, R. Narcotics, Corruption and Development in the Countries of the OECS: The Problem in the Smaller Islands of the Commonwealth Caribbean, Caribbean Affairs 3: 1, 1990 West Indian Commission A Time for Action: Report of the West Indian Commission, Mona: The Press, University of the West Indies, 1992

World Health Organization Health and Environment in Sustainable Developments Five years after the Earth Summit, 1997 OUTLINE OF ASSESMENT EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT 60% Written Papers – 4 hours 30 minutes Paper 01 (1 hour 30 minutes) Fifteen compulsory shirt-response questions 27% Paper 02 ( 3 hours) Eight essay questions of which candidates must answer four 33% INTERNAL ASSESSMENT 40% Paper 03A The internal assessment will consist of a research project. The project will enable the student to demonstrate skills and competencies developed from each of the three modules. Paper 03B

Private candidates are required to write Paper 03B, an Alternative Paper to the Internal Assessment MODERATION OF INTERNAL ASSESSMENT An Internal Assessment Record Sheet will be sent each year to schools submitting students for the examinations. All Internal Assessment Record Sheets and sample of assignments must be submitted to CXC by May 31 of the year of the examination. A sample of assignments will be requested by CXC for moderation purposes. These samples will be reassessed by CXC examiners who moderate the Internal Assessment. Teachers’ marks may be adjusted as a result of moderation.

The Examiners’ comments will be sent to schools. Copies of the students’ assignments that are not submitted must be retained by the school until three months after publication by CXC of the examination results ASSESSMENT DETAILS External Assessment by Written Papers (60% of Total assessment) There will be a combined question paper and answer booklet for Paper 01 Paper 01 (1 hour 30 minutes – 27% of Total Assessment) 1. Number of Questions This paper is made up of 15 compulsory short-response questions covering all three modules 2. Syllabus Coverage Knowledge of all topics is required.

The intention is to test candidates’ knowledge across the breadth of the syllabus 3. Question type Questions will be structured, consisting of two, three or four parts. Questions will test candidates’ understanding of concepts and issues 4. Mark Allocation Questions will not necessarily be awarded the same number of marks. A question may be worth three, four, five or at most six marks The maximum number of marks for this paper is 80. This paper contributes 27% of the total mark for the Unit Paper 02 (3 hours – 33% of Total Assessment) 1. Number of Questions

This paper consists of eight questions. Candidates are required to answer for questions, two from Module 1 and two from Module 2 2. Syllabus Coverage This paper tests Modules 1 and 2. Four questions will be set on Module 1 and four questions on Module 2. Candidates are required to answer two questions on each module. 3. Question Type Questions in this section will test higher order thinking skills such as application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Candidates will be expected to present a case for or against a particular point of view, using the concepts and issues discussed in the course

There will be two types of questions. Type A There will be four questions of this type. These will test candidates’ ability to explain and elaborate on conceptual issues and apply general principles to a problem situation. Each question is worth 20 marks and candidates are required to answer one of two questions on Module 1 and one of two questions on Module 2 Type B There will be four questions of this type. These will require candidates to analyze problem cases, discuss and make evaluate comments or issues and present arguments for or against a particular point of view.

Each question is worth 30 marks and candidates are required to answer one of two questions on Module 1 and one of two questions on module 2. INTERNAL ASSESSMENT Paper 03A – Internal Assessment (40% of Total Assessment) Internal Assessment is an integral part of student assessment in the course covered by this syllabus. It is intended to assist students in acquiring certain knowledge, skills and attitudes that are associated with the subject. The activities for the Internal Assessment are linked to the syllabus and should orm part of the learning activities to enable the student to achieve the objectives of the syllabus. During the course of study for the subject, students obtain marks for the competence they develop and demonstrate in undertaking their Internal Assessment assignments. These marks contribute to the final marks and grades that are awarded to students for their performance in the examination The guidelines provided in this syllabus for selecting appropriate tasks are intended to assist teachers and students in selecting assignments that are valid for the purpose of Internal Assessment.

The guidelines provided for the assessment of these assignments are intended to assist teachers in awarding marks that are reliable estimates of the achievement of students in the Internal Assessment component of the course. In order to ensure that the scores awarded by the teachers are not out of line with the CXC standards, the Council undertakes the moderation of a sample of the Internal Assessment assignments marked by each teacher. Internal Assessment provides an opportunity to individualize a part of the curriculum to meet the needs of students. It facilitates feedback to the student at various stages of the experience.

This helps to build the self-confidence of students as they proceed with their studies. Internal Assessment also facilitates the development of critical skills and abilities emphasized by this CAPE subject, and enhance the validity of the examination on which candidate performance is reported. Internal Assessment therefore makes a significant and unique contribution to both the development of relevant skills and the testing and rewarding of students for the development of those skills. The Caribbean Examinations Council seeks to ensure that the Internal Assessment scores are valid and reliable estimates of accomplishment.

The guidelines provided in this syllabus are intended to assist in doing so. The internal assessment component of the examination is worth 120 marks. This contributes 40% of the total mark for the unit. The Research Project The internal assessment for this Unit is a research project on a topic selected on any area of the themes outlines on pages 22-25 of the syllabus. The assignment is worth a total of 120 marks for the internal assessment FORMAT OF THE REEARCH PROJECT I. II. Length: 2,000 – 2,500 words Structure: Cover Page (Title, Name, Date): Acknowledgements Table of Contents: III. a. Introduction and Purpose of Research b.

Literature Review c. Data Collection sources d. Presentation of Findings e. Interpretation of Findings f. Discussion g. Conclusion/Limitations of the Research/Recommendations h. Bibliography i. Appendices Allocation of Marks for the Research Project Marks will be allocated according to the following scheme: Marks A. Introduction and Purpose of research, Statement of Problem (15) Literature Review Data Collection Sources (10) (15) B. C. D. Presentation of Findings (18) Interpretation of Findings (20) E. F. Discussion of Findings (15) G. Conclusion, Limitations of the Research, Recommendations (15) Overall Presentation and Writing Skills (12)

H. *The points to be considered for section H are as follows: Presentation j. Cover Page k. Acknowledgements l. Table of Contents m. Bibliography n. Appendices Mechanics/Writing h. Paragraphing i. Vocabulary, use of language j. Grammar and Spelling marks] [Total 120 Marks for the Research Project would be allocated across Modules in the ratio 1: 1: 4. For example if the total marks for the project is 72, divide the mark in the ratio 1: 1: 4. Therefore the candidate will receive 12 marks. For Module 1, 12 marks for Module 2 and 48 marks for Module 3 CARIBBEAN EXAMINATIONS COUNCIL CARIBBEAN ADVANCED PROFICIENCY EXAMINATION

CARIBBEAN STUDIES MARK SCHEME Candidates will be awarded a total of 12 marks for communicating information in a logical way using correct grammar. The marks are awarded in Section H in the mark scheme below RESEARCH PROJECT A. INTRODUCTION marks) (Purpose of research – Statement of Problem) ? (15 Excellent explanation of the purpose of the research ? Very good explanation of the statement of the question or problem to be researched ? Explained very well the educational value of the research ? Defined clearly all or nearly all the technical terms used in the study (13-15 marks) ? Explained well the purpose of the research ?

Stated clearly the question or problem to be researched ? Explained well the educational value of the research ? Defined clearly most or nearly all the technical terms used in the study (10 – 12 marks) ? Explained adequately the purpose of the research ? Stated adequately the question or problem to be researched ? Explained adequately the educational value of the research ? Defined adequately technical terms used in the study (7-9 marks) ? Explained in a limited way the purpose of the research ? Stated vaguely the question or problem to be researched ? Explained vaguely the educational value of the research Defined a limited number of technical terms used in the study (4 – 6 marks) ? Explained poorly the purpose of the research ? Stated inadequately the question or problem to be researched ? Provided no clear explanation of the educational value of the research ? Provided no meaningful definition of technical terms used in the study (1-3 marks) B. LITERATURE REVIEW marks) (15 ? Showed an excellent understanding of the relevant literature and previous research on the problem and related them properly to the study, that is, placed the research clearly in context (13 – 15 marks) Showed a good understanding of the relevant literature and previous research on the problem and related them properly to the study, that is, placed the research appropriately in context (10 – 12 marks) ? Showed an adequate understanding of the relevant literature and previous research on the problem and related them properly to the study, that is, placed the research satisfactorily in context (7 – 9 marks) ? Showed a limited understanding of the relevant literature and previous research on the problem and related them in a limited manner to the present study, that is, placed the research in context in a limited way (4 – 6 marks) Showed a poor understanding of the relevant literature and previous research and showed little or no connection to the present study, that is, was unable to put the research in context (1 – 3 marks) C. DATA COLLECTION SOURCES (10 marks) ? Gave an excellent description of the different sources, from which information was collected and was obtained and how these sources contribute to an understanding of the research problem (9 – 10 marks) ? Gave an good description of the different sources, from which information was obtained and how these sources contribute to an understanding of the research problem (7 – 8 marks) Gave an adequate description of the different sources, from which information was obtained and how these sources contribute to an understanding of the research problem (5 – 6 marks) ? Gave a limited description of the different sources, from which information was obtained and how these sources contribute to an understanding of the research problem (3 – 4 marks) ? Gave a poor description of the different sources, from which information was obtained and how these sources contribute to an understanding of the research problem (1-2 marks) D. PRESENTATION OF FINDINGS marks) (18 Gave an excellent presentation of the findings using a variety of tables, graphs, maps or text and other forms that are appropriate, well labeled, presented accurately (16 – 18 marks) ? Gave a good presentation of the findings using a variety of tables, graphs, maps or text and other forms that are appropriate, well labeled, presented accurately most of the time (12 – 15 marks) ? Gave an adequate presentation of the findings and some tables, graphs, maps or text but not using as many varied methods as could have been used; the data were for the most part accurate and adequately labeled (8 – 11 marks) Gave a weak presentation of the findings using few graphs or tables or text, not always using the most effective method; the data were not always well presented or accurate (4 – 7 marks) ? Gave a poor presentation of the findings; little though is given to the labeling and presentation and to the accuracy of the data (1 – 3 marks) E. INTERPRETATION OF FINDINGSDISCUSSION OF FINDINGS (20 marks) ? Interpretation was very well, accurate and very relevant to the issues being studied (17 – 20 marks) ? Interpretation was clear, accurate and relevant to the issues being studied (13-16 marks) Interpretation was not clear, not always accurate and not always relevant to the issues being studied (9 – 12 marks) ? Interpretation was unclear, inaccurate and of limited relevance to the issues being studied (5 – 8 marks) ? Interpretation was generally unclear, inaccurate and was of little relevance to the issues being studied (1 – 4 marks) F. DISCUSSION OF FINDINGS (15 marks) ? Provided an excellent discussion of findings and their implications and comparison with previous studies (13 – 15 marks) ? Provided a good discussion of findings and their implications and comparison with previous studies (10-12 marks) Provided a satisfactory discussion of findings and their implications and comparison with previous studies (7 – 9 marks) ? Provided a limited discussion of findings and their implications; little reference to previous studies were made (4 – 6 marks) ? Provided a very limited discussion of findings and their implications, no reference to previous studies were made (1 – 3 marks) G. CONCLUSIONS, LIMITATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS (15 marks) • Conclusions were very clearly stated, very well developed, logical and relevant (13 – 15 marks) Conclusions were clearly stated, were well developed, logical and relevant (10 – 12 marks) • Conclusions were satisfactorily stated, developed, some recommendations (7 – 9 marks) • Conclusions were inadequately stated, showed limited relevance and development, recommendations were inappropriate and not very practical (4 – 6 marks) • Conclusions were inappropriate and showed little or no relevance or practical value (1-3 marks) H. OVERALL PRESENTATION AND WRITING SKILLS (12 marks) (Communication of information in a logical way using correct grammar) i.

Presentation (4 marks) • Provided appropriate layout, and relevant tables of content, bibliography, appendices, cover page (4 marks) • Provided adequate layout, and relevant tables of content, bibliography, appendices, cover page (3 marks) • Provided layout appropriate for the most part, and tables of content, bibliography, cover page (2 marks) • Provided a weak presentation and only some of the important elements such as table of content, bibliography, appendices, cover page and those that were given were not well done (1 mark) ii. Writing Skills (8 marks) Demonstrated very high level of writing competence, for example, organization, use of language, grammar, spelling (7 – 8 marks) • Demonstrated high level of writing competence, for example, organization, use of language, grammar, spelling (5 – 6 marks) • Demonstrated adequate writing skills, for example, organization, use of language, grammar, spelling (4 marks) • Demonstrated limited writing skills, for example, weak use of language and grammar, several spelling errors (3 marks) • Demonstrated poor writing skills, for example, poor use of language, poor grammar, many errors in spelling (1 – 2 marks)