The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Movie Tie-in Edition)

Summary:
Stieg Larsson, the profound Swedish writer/journalist, left the media with three unpublished books before he died in November 2004, namely The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played with Fire, and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest, which were later published as the Millennium Trilogy. Out of them The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo emerged as a #1 bestseller, hitting over a million sales. A sensational storyline and an enthralling narration copulates to give rise to the English motion picture written by Steve Zaillan and directed by David Flincher, which was released in 2011.

The story goes like this – Mikael Blomkvist, who happens to be the editor of an inquisitive financial magazine called Millennium, is charged with illegal defamation of a crooked financier, by the Swedish Court. Following this disgraceful act, Blomkvist chooses to take a break from work; but is enticed by Vanger Corp outside work, to find resolution to a 30 year old pending case, which circles around the mysterious disappearance of Harriet Vanger, a teenager and supposedly the heir of the Vanger fortune.

Accepting the cold case, Mikael looks for an efficient partner who would aid him in the investigation; following a short search, he encounters a 25 year old young woman, a highly potential hacker-investigator who has been mis-declared as mentally incompetent by the state. Soon he finds out that Lisbeth Salander, the misunderstood Einstein of a researcher who is emotionally imbalanced and socially disabled to a noticeable extent, possess great caliber for investigation and case-solving. Supplemented by a dragon tattoo and piercings, the girl’s behavior reflects peculiarity; however, being an extremely skilled hacker of computer networks, Lisbeth starts working with Mikael to crack the tortuous case that has been badgering the minds of Eric Vanger, the missing character’s uncle and other investigative researchers.

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Review:
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is a captivating blend of murder, sex, violence, family drama, financial complications, and several shady contents that the author lays out in an amusing, intriguing manner. The author seems to have done a bit of psychoanalysis himself while designing the storyline, for the plot is a seamless labyrinth and is out of question for the readers to predict or decipher. The book radiates awe and anxiety as the blinker-bound investigators trace their evidences appropriately to unravel the meandrous mystery.

Larsson effectively portrays the ideal images of gore and delirium, highlighting the razor-sharp edges of the minds of criminals and similar necro-sapiens, which tend to inflict greater damage to the society as well as its bordering environment. Introspective abilities of the investigators that mark their progress towards the otherside of the case successfully keeps the reader engrossed in the book and the author’s narration tends to cease any non-reading activities within the minds of the readers. This is one astounding piece of art that lives up to its hype and takes the readers beyond the realms of expectation and anxiety.

One line review: Anticipate the unexpected while you find yourself somewhere deep within your recently-accessed oblivion of imagination.